Skip to main content

Tutt Library Research Guides

 

AN238 & FG238 - Gender and Class in Latin America: START HERE - Foundational Information

Examining the issues of gender and class dynamics in Latin America through ethnography, using a feminist, intersectional viewpoint.

Syllabus

AN/FG 238:

GENDERING

LATIN AMERICA

Image result for gender latin america

Block 6, 2016

Barnes 403 (9:15 am)

Professor Sarah Hautzinger

719-389-6359

Office Hours:

M & Th 2:00-4:00

(Just come by, or reserve time at https://shautzinger.youcanbook.me/)

 

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR6WC27UM7yO3iyx8aMq7nffgseM8cB9XP2xOf4dvNPhnUvmeOqWQThis course explores the role gender plays across diverse sites in South and Central Americas, as well as the Caribbean. Social movements, division of labor, sexualities, power struggles and violence are among areas examined from feminist, ethnographic and comparative perspectives. Emphasis on gender’s intersections with ethnic, national, linguistic, class and geographical diversity demands students’ strong grasp of empirical information about the region. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

           

Image result for gender latin americaWe pay special attention to gender’s role in shaping production, reproduction, labor organization, roles in development, and politics. We look at women’s and men’s lives through a framework of feminist gender studies, because we can only understand gendered positions in society as created through interrelationship. In the first portion of the class we concentrate on the impact of colonization on indigenous women, and continue this theme into more contemporary representations of gendered class, ethnic and political dynamics through the life history of Rigoberta Menchú and the imbroglio it provoked. We then turn to a series of articles on family, kinship, and development, with particular attention to how women and men’s productive and reproductive work conditions their social positions, how gendered ideologies arise from these processes, including (so-called) machismo and marianismo. A father-daughter authored case study about a movement founded by young rural women leads into our “teach-in” about the many types of women’s and feminist movements manifest throughout the region. We round out the course with two full-length ethnographies, one on the criminalization of men’s violence against women, and the second on particularly on men’s sexuality, reproduction and masculinity. The remainder of the class is devoted to your independent research, presentation, and writing about a project whose focus you will shape.

Required Texts (in order we read):

 

Rubin, Jeffery W. and Sokoloff-Rubin, Emma. 2013. Sustaining Activism: A Brazilian Women’s Movement and a Father-Daughter Collaboration. Duke University Press.

 

Hautzinger, Sarah. 2007. Violence in the City of Women: Police and Batterers in Brazil. Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

Gutmann, Matthew. 2007. Fixing Men: Sex, Birth Control and AIDs in Mexico. University of California Press.

 

Additional Readings from articles are on Canvas.

 

Course Requirements:

Course format consists of short lectures, large and small group discussions, and presentations of student work. Some days of class will have assigned student leaders, who together with me will guide discussion. Scrupulous attendance is assumed; each day students should arrive prepared and having thought about readings.

 

Participation (attendance, contribution to in-class activity, responses)       25%

Teach-In Panels:                                                                                              20%

Quiz                                                                                                                 15%

Final project:                                                                                                    40%    

(See assignment for detail: topics and proposal with annotated bibliography 5%; presentation 10%; paper 25%)

                                                                                                                       

The final paper is a research project of 8-12 pages. While you may write on a topic of your choice, it is important that papers reflect the emphasis of the course – avoid topics peripheral the concerns of this course (assignment elaborates). You should submit 2-4 ideas on Monday of Week 2; and a project proposal by Tuesday of Week 3 of class and receive approval before proceeding. At least two scholarly sources outside our class readings should comprise your annotated bibliography. Please consult me if you need ideas, direction toward materials, and so on! All students will give short presentations on their research projects in class.

 

Course Schedule

Class meets from 9:15-12:00, except where noted.

 

Week One

Feb. 15-M

Introduction to the course—what/where/how/why

Watch Teresa Meade on “Gender” & “Race” from North American historian’s perspective. Critique: beyond obvious, what’s important, little known here? What might you do differently were you to redo more informed by F/G &/or anthropological perspectives?

Attend First Monday – Poet Claudia Rankine

Feb. 16-T

Gender in Pre-Colonial-to-Colonial Complex State Societies (69 pages)

Kartunnen, Frances. 1997. “Rethinking Malinche.” In Indian Women of Early Mexico. Schroeder, Wood & Hasket, eds., pp 291-312 (21).

Nash, June. 1980. “Aztec Women: The Transition from Status to Class in Empire and Colony. In Women and Colonization, pp. 134-148 (12 total).

Silverblatt, I. 1980. “The World Has Turned Inside Out … There is no Justice for Us Here.” In Women and Colonization, pp. 149-185 (36 total).

 

Feb. 17-W

Life (and) History: A Quiché Maya Heroine (67 pages)

Burgos-Debray, Elisabeth 1992. “Introduction” xi-xxi (15) and Rigoberta Menchú, Chs. I  “The Family” (6), XI “Marriage Ceremonies” (29), XXIV “The Torture and Death of Her Little Brother”  (10). In I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. ed. London: Verso.

Stoll, David. 2003. “Rigoberta Menchú and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans. Rigoberta The Story of All Poor Guatemalans,” 135-141 (6). In Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America, D. Heath, ed. Westview.

Grandin, Greg. 2010. It Was Heaven That They Burned Who is Rigoberta Menchú? The Nation, Sept. 8 (7). http://www.thenation.com/article/154582/it-was-heaven-they-burned

 

Feb. 18-Th

The Debate over Marianismo & Machismo I (50 pages)

Stevens, E. 1973. “Marianismo: The Other Face of Machismo.” In Male and Female in Latin America, pp. 90-101. (11)

Navarro, Marysa. 2002. “Against Marianismo.” In Gender’s Place: Feminist Anthropologies of Latin America, Palgrave Macmillan.257-272. (25)

Elhers, T. 1991. “Debunking Marianismo: Economic Vulnerability and Survival Strategies among Guatemalan Wives.” Ethnology 1-14. (14).

 

Feb. 19-F

Writing Activism, Transnational Mirroring (82 pages)

Rubin, Jeffery W. and Sokoloff-Rubin, Emma. 2013. Sustaining Activism: A Brazilian Women’s Movement and a Father-Daughter Collaboration. Duke University Press. Prefaces (ix-xxii), Chs. 1-6, pp.1-68.

 

**11 a.m. Geography & Terms Quiz**

 

Week Two

Feb. 22-M

Gendering Social Movements (91 pages)

Rubin, Jeffery W. and Sokoloff-Rubin, Emma. 2013. Sustaining Activism: A Brazilian Women’s Movement and a Father-Daughter Collaboration. Chs. 7-11, pp. 69-160.

 

-- Due: List of 2-4 potential paper topics –

 

Feb. 23-T

Women, Work, Family & Economy (40 total)

Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 1997. “Culture, Scarcity, and Maternal  Thinking: Maternal Detachment in a Brazilian Shantytown.” In Understanding Medical Anthropology, pp. 375-387. (12)

Buechler, Hans. 2003. “Doña Flor and the ‘Informal Sector’ Debate: Entrepreneurial Strategies in a Bolivian Enterprise.” In Contemporary Societies and Cultures of Latin America, D. Heath, ed. Westview, pp. 189-202. (13)

Safa, Helen. 2010. “Female-Headed Households and Poverty in Latin America” A Comparison of Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.” In Women’s Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean, Maier & Lebon, eds. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers UP, pp 60-75 (15).

 

Feb. 24-W

*** No Class—Reading and Research Day***

Meetings with Sarah as needed

 

Feb. 25-Th

Teach-In: Women’s Movements, Feminist Movements and Social Change

Morning & Afternoon Class 1:30-3 pm

 

Panel Presentations: Students read independently, sharing three regions in panels (see assignment for details and for source material).

Feb. 26-F

Gender-Based Conflict & Violence. (150 pages)

Hautzinger, S. 2007. Violence in the City of Women. “Prologue,” “Introduction,” and Chs. 1-2 Ch. 2.

 

**Virtual visit from Peru with anthropologist Eshe Lewis**

 

 

Week Three

Feb.   29-M

GBV, Gendered Policing & Citizenship (140 pages)

Hautzinger, S. 2007. Violence in the City of Women. Chs. 3-5 and “Conclusion & Epilogue” pp. 136-276.

 

**Anthropologist Kelly Johnson joins us as a discussant**

 

March 1-T

*** No Class—Reading and Research Day***

Meetings with Sarah as needed

 

--Paper Proposals with Annotated Bibliographies Due, 3:00 pm--

 

March 2-W

Sex, Reproduction and Changing Masculinities in Mexico (99 pages)

Gutmann, Matthew. 2007. Fixing Men: Sex, Birth Control and AIDs in Mexico. University of California Press. Chs 1-4, pp. 1-99.

 

March 3-Th

Sex, Reproduction and Changing Masculinities in Mexico (112 pages)

Gutmann, Matthew. 2007. Fixing Men: Sex, Birth Control and AIDs in Mexico. University of California Press. Chs. 5-8, pp. 100-212.

 

March 4-F

*** Media & Popular Culture Day, samplings TBA***

No Assigned Reading; work on projects

 

Week Four

March 7-M

Visit: Eric Popkin on Refugees, Children and Families

Listen to WOLA podcast “Children, Families and Danger at the Texas-Mexico Border7 Aug 2014

 

March 8-T

Class Presentations on Final Projects

 

March 9-W

Class Presentations Continued

-- Final Papers Due –

 

 

Tutt Library, Colorado College      Research Help Desk: 719-389-6662, Texting: 719-387-5441, E-mail: tuttref@ColoradoCollege.edu